Iegor Reznikoff singing at Arcy-sur-Cure cave in Burgundy on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4 are presenting a new series called ‘Noise: a Human History’. It is presented by Professor David Hendy. Although he is not a researcher with a background in Music Archaeology or Archaeoaocustics, he does however present a very interesting series of programmes, including recordings of Iegor Reznikoff singing in a cave in France.

The programme is to be broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on Monday 18th March 2013 at 13:45.

Clips from the programme can be seen online by clicking on the images below.

DURATION: 02:01 Musicologist Iégor Reznikoff makes the caves of Arcy-sur-Cure in Burgundy "whisper, hum, talk and sing".

DURATION: 02:01
Musicologist Iégor Reznikoff makes the caves of Arcy-sur-Cure in Burgundy “whisper, hum, talk and sing”.

DURATION: 01:05 Is this how caves sounded to our prehistoric ancestors?  The undoubted star of Episode 1 is Iégor Reznikoff, who sang for us in the cave of Arcy-sur-Cure. Professor Reznikoff is an expert in ancient music and early Christian chant.  His technique is to use 'just intonation'. It sounds unusual and exotic. But modern musical styles don't become attuned to these archaic places. Use 'primitive' sounds, however, and the singer's body and the cave vibrate together as this extended clip of Professor Reznikoff demonstrates.

DURATION: 01:05
Is this how caves sounded to our prehistoric ancestors?
The undoubted star of Episode 1 is Iégor Reznikoff, who sang for us in the cave of Arcy-sur-Cure. Professor Reznikoff is an expert in ancient music and early Christian chant.
His technique is to use ‘just intonation’. It sounds unusual and exotic. But modern musical styles don’t become attuned to these archaic places. Use ‘primitive’ sounds, however, and the singer’s body and the cave vibrate together as this extended clip of Professor Reznikoff demonstrates.

You can access the programme website by clicking here.

 

Reznikoff uses throat singing or overtone chanting. The reverberation in this recording is very long, and so the sounds are very loud. Interestingly many of the Spanish painted caves are not nearly as reverberant as this.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s